Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Haaretz on its daily warpath

Once again the Haaretz newspaper is on the warpath, targeting its bitter Zionist enemy, the State of Israel.

Note the following headlines from the past 24 hours:

"Hamas fires four rockets from Gaza into Israel, in rare move"  [Since when is it rare for Hamas to fire rockets at Israel or try to kill Jews? Just 3 days earlier, the Hamas orchastrated a rocket attack on Eilat]

"IDF deploys tanks near Egypt border, in violation of peace treaty" [Ooops, Haaretz forgot to mention in the headline this was to quash a halt a real-time terror attack originating from the Egyptian held Sinai deset, in which an Israeli was killed.]

"Israel agrees to release hunger-striking Palestinian soccer player" [Why bother mentioning in the headline that he's affiliated with terrorist organizations?]

Yet do we see Haaretz mention anything about Israeli MK Ahmed Tibi's refusing to allow a space museum in the Israeli Arab of town -- to be named for Israel's first astronaut, Ilan Ramon?  Not a word.
Knesset Member Ahmad Tibi (United Arab List-Ta'al) has asked Science and Technology Minister Daniel Hershkowitz (Habayit Hayehudi) to cancel the plan to name a new space center in Tayibe after Ilan Ramon, the first Israeli astronaut.

Ramon was killed along with six other crew members of the Space Shuttle Columbia when it disintegrated upon re-entry on February 1, 2003.

MK Tibi explained his request by saying that during his service as a fighter pilot in the Israel Air Force Ramon took part in "bombings of civilian populations during the first Lebanon war and in attacks in other Arab countries." (ynet)
Unless you consider yourself an anti-Zionist, its best to avoid reading Haaretz.


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4 comments:

Yoni R. said...

As long as we're talking about honestly reporting the entire story, Tibi did not refuse to allow a space museum in an Israeli Arab town. First of all, it's not up to him to allow it; he just made a request of the appropriate minister. Secondly, he's not against the space center, just against naming it after Rimon.

For sure, these are minor differences, and the "punch line" of the story, which you did convey, is that he doesn't want a center named after Rimon in an Israeli-Arab town. But if you're going to put the story in the context of a "truth-in-journalism" post, you should make sure you're up to snuff as well.

:)

Jameel @ The Muqata said...

Hi Yoni - if you read carefully what I wrote, it says: "Yet do we see Haaretz mention anything about Israeli MK Ahmed Tibi's refusing to allow a space museum in the Israeli Arab of town -- to be named for Israel's first astronaut, Ilan Ramon?"

I guess it depends how you read the sentence; as I wrote it, it was clear (to me) that his issue was directed at it being named for Ilan Ramon, and I also immediately quoted the text from ynet which also stated it clearly.

One could argue that had I put the sentence structure in reverse order, it could have been clearer, yet I don't think I should lose journalistic brownie points for it.

:-)

yoni r. said...

Well, I chose to read it using English grammar as my guide. If the intention would just have been that Tibi's objection was about the naming, then you should have used commas to set off the phrase about the location, as so:

"Yet do we see Haaretz mention anything about Israeli MK Ahmed Tibi's refusing to allow a space museum, in the Israeli Arab of town [sic.], to be named for Israel's first astronaut, Ilan Ramon?"

The phrase set off by commas modifies the previous noun ("space museum"), and can be easily lifted out of the sentence.

Instead, you used a dash (which I assumed was your intention with the double-hyphen mark you used). A dash is used, inter alia, to indicate a break in thought in a sentence. Thus, the naming of the space museum is less related to Tibi's objection than is its location.

So your sentence was clear. It just didn't say what you wanted it to.

In any event, Tibi did not refuse to allow anything; he only made a request. The fact is, like it or not, it's his job to represent the Arab sector. Since Ramon did fight against Arabs, it's a reasonable request. If Tibi would be the Science and Technology Minister and actually refused to allow the museum (or refused to name it after Ramon), that would be a big deal. As a minister, it's his job to serve the entire country, not just those that got him into office.

To review: A request to a minister as a representative of a particular sector, wholly appropriate (even if the request is distasteful). An action by a minister which reflects narrow sectarian views, which are distasteful to most Israelis, usually not appropriate.

قوالب html said...

thanks alot

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