Thursday, October 05, 2006

UK: Muslim policeman allowed to refuse to gaurd Israeli Consulate

A Muslim police officer has been allowed to refuse to guard the Israeli embassy in London.

A spokesman for Scotland Yard said Sir Ian had ordered a rethink of the service's policy to consider special dispensations on moral grounds.

Samizdata says:

A 'rethink'? When ordered to carry out his job and protect a location within the United Kingdom from unlawful attack, PC Alexander Omar Basha took the view that it would be immoral to protect that place (in other words, he refused to enforce British law regarding possible acts of violence because of who the potential target was). The only 'rethink' needed is why was he not fired on the spot? I wonder... has a Jewish policeman in the UK attached to the Diplomatic Protection Group ever refused to guard the embassy of a Muslim country in Britain? (hat-tip; RF)

Well...we had an Israeli Druze Border Policeman, Madhat Yousef guarding Kever Yosef in Shechem --where he was attacked by Arabs. The IDF decided to let the Palestinian Authority "restore order" so he could be evacuated...yet the PA being the PA...didn't really get it's act together, and Madhat Yousef bled to death.

I wonder in retrospect, if would he rather have been a policeman in the UK?


Wherever I am, my blog turns towards Eretz Yisrael

14 comments:

marallyn ben moshe said...

in canada we had a muslim who wanted to be an RCMP (royal canadian mounted police)...but he refused to take off his kaffiyah...Sgt. Mahmood of the Mounties in his red uniform and checkered kaffiyah...I DON'T THINK SO...you don't like the garb don't join the team...canada has two national languages...english and french...so far

Elster said...

It' absurd. Political correctness only seems to work in one direction these days.

Ari Kinsberg said...

regarding what happened to yousef, may his blood be avenged a thousand-fold, israelis really are complete and total idiots. that's the gratitude a goy, an arab no less, gets for defending jews. whoever made that decision should be put in jail for murder.

Ari Kinsberg said...

. . . do you know if there ever was an inquiry and if any heads rolled?

Jameel @ The Muqata said...

Ari: No Heads rolled. Period.

Then again, don't forget how wonderful Israel was to the South Lebanese Army (SLA) which fought shoulder to shoulder with them, and then we stabbed them in the back.

Ari Kinsberg said...

israel is indebted to the sla as well and i agree that that have not received proper recognition for their contribution to israel's security. but there is a big differnce between the sla and israeli druze. the sla was a foreign militia with its own agenda that corresponded very well with israel's needs. they were not le-chatchila interested in defending israel. the druze on the other hand take an oath to defend a jewish state.

Jack's Shack said...

I say give him a swift boot to the head.

kahaneloyalist said...

Would we really want a Muslims defending Jews anyway? Its like complaining that the fox refuses to guard the hen house

SEAWITCH said...

This police officer was married by Bakri http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2006/10/06/npc06.xml. The cleric that celebrated 9-11 and 7-7 and who was expelled and banned form the UK.

tafka PP said...

This isn't a Muslim issue per se: As the article you linked to says, it is about perceptions of morality and moral grounds of refusal. There is more to examine here: The UK citizens who were protesting US planes refuelling at British airports (en route to Israel with armaments for the last war) were not largely Muslim: They were "street" British citizens concerned at perceived UK assistance towards an "immoral" war. And being as the popular view in the UK appears to be that Israel's treatment of the Palestinians is equally immoral, this might well lead to many more incidents of the kind you've highlighted in this post, but not involving Muslims.

Such is the problematic nature of a precedent like this, and we all need to look beyond this one incident in examining it as opposed to localise it.

kasamba said...

What kind of business is this?
Only in this demented country.

Martin Cooper said...

Let me start by saying that it's appalling that PC Basha was allowed to refuse to guard the Israeli Embassy in London. There's even a British saying along the lines of "You take the King's shilling, you do the King's bidding." We could all go on ad nauseam about moral rot, political correctness, and Britain and Europe in terminal denial about the Islamist threat to Western civilization, blah blah blah.

That said, what differentiates PC Basha's attitude from that of all those here in Israel who demanded that IDF soldiers and Israel Police officers "refuse" to carry out their orders during the disengagement from Gaza, in Amona, and so forth, on grounds of Halacha, an "evil decree," "black flags", etc? And lets not exempt the leftist "refuseniks" who won't serve in the IDF at all or won't serve in the "occupied territories."

I know, someone here will bring up the Nazis, their "I was just obeying orders" defense, and so forth--but we're not talking extremes here, nor the policies of a horrendous, murderous totalitarian dictatorship. We're addressing the duty of public servants, especially members of the security forces, for whom their moral obligation, in the normal course of events, is to carry out loyally the policies of the democratically elected governments that employ them, however distasteful it may be to them personally.

fellista said...

Hi, my name is Danny and I used to have problems getting my dog under my control. In fact, I lost all self confidence at some stage and

mevaseretzion said...

Martin,

Your comparison is false.

Basha refused to defend innocent Jews from possible attack. I don't think anyone, even the most fanatical, would accept a Jewish policeman who refuses to defend an innocent arab in Israel against real danger.

Gaza and Amona are more truthfully compared to Basha if he were commanded to expel all Moslems from London. In that case, I think we would all understand the moral repugnancy of forcing a man to expel his brothers from their homes.

I guess the only people who don't see it as a moral repugnity, rather, all in a day's work, are the israeli Yassam.

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